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A collection of sample imagery


Animated Australian NDVI Sequence (1981 - 1991)

Click on the image above to see an animated sequence of satellite images of the greenness (NDVI) of the Australian land surface. Many individual NOAA AVHRR images have been composited to produce an average landcover greenness for each month from July 1981 to March 1991. The images are colour-coded from mauve (no greenness, low NDVI values) through red - yellow - green - blue (high greenness and NDVI values). The very severe drought of 1982 - 1983 can be detected by variation in landcover greenness in the winter rainfall areas of the continent for the months of August, September and October.

 Animated Australian NDVI Sequence (1981 - 1994), using Pathfinder data

Click on the image above to see an animated sequence of the greeness (NDVI) of the Australian continent for each month from January 1981 to December 1991. This series was generated from the Pathfinder AVHRR Land NDVI time series which was temporally filtered to reduce the effects of cloud. The filtering process is described in an EOC Report. The images are colour-coded from red (no greenness, low NDVI values) through yellow to green (high greenness and NDVI values). The evergreen forest regions in southern Western Australia, Tasmania and along the eastern sea-board are green throughout this time series. Southern grasslands, shrublands and croplands are greenest in spring. This is can be seen as waves of green sweeping across the southern parts of the images and then retreating. A similar sequence is seen in the tropical regions, but these areas are green at a different time of year. The seasonal wheat crop cycle is clearly illustrated in southern Western Australia. This is seen as a red (dry) patch from January to May and again in November and December. The red area becomes green in the late winter-spring months when the crop is growing vigorously.

Animated Global NDVI Sequence (1985 - 1988)

Click on the image above to see an animated sequence of satellite images of the greenness of the global land surface. Many NOAA AVHRR scenes have been composited to produce an average landcover greenness from April 1985 to December 1988. The images are colour-coded from mauve (no greenness, low NDVI values) through red - yellow - green - blue (high greenness and NDVI values).

Two points to note - firstly, how little of the Australian continent is green compared to the rest of the world; secondly, the enormous changes that occur over the huge land masses of Europe and Northern America during the Northern hemisphere Spring & Summer - May, June and July.

These sequences were reproduced from "Looking Back: the changing face of the Australian continent 1972 - 1992" by Dean Graetz, Rohan Fisher and Murray Wilson. Copyright CSIRO 1992.


NOAA AVHRR

This image is a full scene captured from the AVHRR instrument on board the NOAA 14 satellite. This particular scene covers central and eastern Australia and was acquired by the receiving station operated by AIMS in Townsville, Queensland. Click on the image for a larger version.
Coverage: About 2000 by 4500 km
Resolution: 1000m
Date: 20 July 1996
Time: 04:31 GMT
Orbit: 8010
Channels: 5
This image is a composite of the same NOAA14 overpass, as captured by four different receiving stations across the continent - Darwin (Bureau of Meteorology), Townsville (AIMS), Perth (WASTAC), Hobart (CSIRO).

Coverage: About 2000 by 8500 km
Resolution: 1000m
Date: 28/10/95


Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS)

This is a full scene image from GMS covering the whole globe from a southern perspective and is taken in the visible band. GMS also images in the infrared at a lower resolution.

(Data supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the Japan Meteorological Agency)


Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM)

This image is a colour composite of three of the seven bands from a Landsat TM scene acquired over the city of Wagga Wagga in NSW in October 1994. Channel assignment: band 1 in blue; band 4 in green; band 7 in red. This combination of bands simulates natural colour, with visible blue in blue, vegetation appearing green, and iron oxide (in the soil) appearing red.


Hymap

Tanjil Bren, Victoria: This sub-alpine forestry site is being investigated using both hyperspectral remote sensing and field based methods to investigate the adverse effect of psyllid insect defoliation and damage to eucalyptus forestry areas. This site is also used extensively to model canopy geometry and its influence on the spectral nature of the vegetation canopy. Lidar experiments are currently being used to measure and validate biomass assessments. The image is created from a mosaic of 4 georectified Hymap runs at a 10m spatial resolution. The principal investigator is Dr Nicholas Coops, Forestry and Forest Products, Melbourne.


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